Presentation Details

Presentation Details

Beate Hölscher: How SAEON and researchers can work together SAEON is mandated to set up a national observation network aimed at providing long term reliable data for scientific research and informed decision making. Researchers /students in the realm of long term observations can benefit from and contribute to the network.
Bettie de Kock: Package deal to academic success During Information literacy awareness month in the USA, President Barack Obama (2012) confirms the importance of an information literate society. The correct use of information and information tools can be seen as a prerequisite for economic progress. According to the Association of College and Research Libraries it is more important than ever to use information wisely. Understanding the ethical and legal use of information can be seen as a performance indicator of an information literate individual. Using the right “package deal” for research purposes might be the pathway to academic progress. (2012) 
Clement Cupido: Photography in the field Presentation description pending
Clement Cupido: Managing photographs for optimum use Presentation description pending
David Spurrett: What is science? (And what is not?) Science has many would-be competitors in the attempt to describe and explain the world, and to tell us what courses of action will lead to what effects. It can often seem as though it is very difficult to tell science from non-science, and it is popular to claim that science is simply “one belief system among many”. Both views are incorrect: It is quite simple to say what science is, and what is great about it.
David Spurrett: Originality and usefulness in science Research institutions (especially governmental) often recognize the development of projects, or the production of reports, as useful returns on investment. However, this allows for stagnation in science, as old ideas can be repeatedly reworked, or projects that are of no real value can be initiated and continued. There should be an emphasis on originality and usefulness in science, recognizing that science does not need to be groundbreaking (most is not) in order to be valuable. Even small studies, such as filling-the-gap science, published as research notes, can be important.
David Ward: The research question The research question is central to research, providing a point from which literature is reviewed and experiments are developed. This pivotal aspect of research is often not given the attention it deserves, and many research questions are later found to be essentially unanswerable, uninteresting to the scientific community, or even already answered in other research.
David Ward: What makes a good experiment? Presentation description pending 
Justin du Toit: Tips and tricks for managing spreadsheet data Experiment or monitoring data are often captured and stored in ways that reduce their potential, make them inaccessible, and allow them to be lost. Some simple principles and tools allow the information in even huge datasets to become easily available and pliable.
Liza von Staden: iSpot - virtual identification Presentation description pending
Luthando Dziba: Where we end up: choosing a career path A career in science faces challenges and opportunities both at individual and institutional levels. An additional dilemma of whether to continue with research or move towards management often confronts young scientists, and decisions here can drastically alter careers in science.
Susi Vetter: People, the environment, and community research People are an integral component of almost all natural systems on earth, yet are often viewed as being ‘unnatural’. Research in natural systems often ignores the human aspect; alternatively, the human component of a system is accommodated as a function and within the context of a particular society.
Susi Vetter: Making platform presentations Platform presentations are nowadays usually dependent on PowerPoint. Despite this technology, many presentations fail to effectively convey the statement the presenter is trying to make.
Tony Palmer: Scientific writing Peer-reviewed articles (‘papers’) are the accepted means of recording and communicating ideas and findings in science. However, the process of scientific writing, especially for beginner scientists, is an arduous one, and scathing reviews of submissions often permanently discourage promising students.
Tony Palmer: Reviewing The anonymous peer-review system is central to scientific research. Carefully executed reviews can substantially improve the quality of a paper, and in turn the abilities of the author. The review process can also be frightening to inexperienced authors, and the comments of reviewers need to be taken in the correct light. Reviewers who are overly interested in structure rather than content can be of disservice to authors.
Vanessa Anderson: Current issues in animal ethics In biological research, animals are often necessary as a factor in an experiment, or the subject of the research itself. The way in which animals are treated (animal ethics) is an important consideration, from both ethical and legislative standpoints.
Victoria Goodall: Data management - making it easier for you An introduction to data management processes, systems metadata and data preparation. Numerous metadata standards and data archiving systems exist, we look at some systems that SAEON use which enable easy archiving of data and searching to discover other research.
Victoria Goodall: Basic introduction to R A brief introduction to the statistical software: basic introduction to R and how it is used for simple analyses and data manipulation.
Wayne Truter: 11 seconds – presenting a successful poster Poster presentations are a valuable, and often the only available, way of presenting work at a congress. This results in many congresses having numerous posters, too many for an individual to read. Therefore, a poster must compete with other posters if it is to be read by the delegates.
Wayne Truter: Finding funding for research Research efforts and opportunities are often limited by the availability of funds. However, considerable monetary resources are available if searched for correctly. Additionally, funds are often renewable if appropriate performance is maintained by the researcher.
To be confirmed: Writing an academic project proposal Within academic environments, project proposals rest most fundamentally on their scientific credibility. However, project proposals, especially at undergraduate or beginner-scientist level, often suffer from irrelevant information, a lack of logical progression, and unclear objectives.
To be confirmed: Sampling vegetation for plant identification Presentation description pending

 

 

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